Southwell Minster (2) The Handford brothers of the Sherwood Foresters

As well as the very special Second World War pieces mentioned in the previous blog post about our visit to Southwell Minster, Nottinghamshire, there was a First World War window with a twist to it. It was dedicated to two brothers killed during the war. I have come across other examples of windows to brothers, notably at Mattersey in the same county (see here: https://faithinwartime.wordpress.com/2015/01/13/huntriss-memorial-window-mattersey-nottinghamshire/ ).

However the two young men commemorated here were both killed on the same day; October 14th 1915 at the Hohenzollern Redoubt during the Battle of Loos.

Southwell Minster 1

The inscription in the bottom right hand corner reads:

For a Remembrance before God of Henry Basil Strutt Handford, Capt. VIIIth Battn Sherwood Foresters, and of Everard Francis Sale Handford, Lieut. VIIIth Battn Sherwood Foresters who were killed in action in France on Oct 14th 1915.
`Lovely and pleasant in their lives, and in their death they were not divided.’

This moving final sentence was taken from the first book of Samuel, 1:23, referring to the lives of King Saul and his son Jonathan, killed in battle fighting the Philistines. This is yet another example of how the memorialisation of death took on a distinctly Christian flavour in the Britain of 100 years ago.

The window depicts St Michael and St George, and I am sure that the blue dragon being slaughtered sports a large moustache and the features of the German Kaiser!

Henry and Everard were the only sons of Major Henry Handford, the medical officer of health for Nottinghamshire, and Hon Mary Handford. Both had attended Rugby School, with Henry being described as a `fine athlete’ and Everard a `prominent Rugby football player’ in the Nottingham Evening Post of 20th October 1915. Both had won places at Trinity College, Cambridge.

Henry took a 2nd Class in the first part of the law tripos in 1914. He had joined the 8th Sherwood Foresters as Second Lieutenant 13th July 1912, was promoted Lieutenant 2nd September 1914 and Captain 26th April 1915. He volunteered for foreign service in August 1914, leaving his law course unfinished, went to France 25th February 1915 and was killed in action at the Hohenzollern Redoubt 15th October 1915, aged 21.

Southwell Minster 12

Henry Handford

Everard had been born in Nottingham 3rd May 1895. He was due to have taken up residence in Cambridge in October 1914 but volunteered for foreign service in August and obtained a commission as Second Lieutenant in the 8th Sherwood Foresters 3rd October 1914, being promoted Lieutenant 1st October 1915. He went to France in 12th July 1915 and was killed in action at the Hohenzollern Redoubt 15th October 1915, aged 20.

Southwell Minster 11

Everard Handford

Like Rudyard Kipling’s son John, featured in the film `My Boy Jack’, and Percy Paris Pope of the Dorchester brewing family, Henry and Everard’s bodies were never recovered, and they are commemorated on a panel of the Loos Memorial in France.

Today their faces stare at us as a distance of 100 years, faces full of hope for the future and the promise of a life to fulfil. However those lives, which had shared their schooling and university careers, were cut so short like those of hundreds of thousands of others in the conflict.

John Broom is the author of Fight the Good Fight: Voices of Faith from the First World War, a series of twenty-three case studies of individuals who experienced the war from a variety of faith perspectives. It features a foreword by respected MP Dan Jarvis, Labour’s spokesman on war commemoration.

Fight the Good Fight

A companion volume, Fight the Good Fight: Voices of Faith from the Second World War, featuring many original interviews with people who lived through the conflict.

Fight the Good Fight2

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2 thoughts on “Southwell Minster (2) The Handford brothers of the Sherwood Foresters

  1. Cliff Smith July 16, 2017 / 6:40 pm

    I have the draft of a book my Grandfather started writing but didn’t finish. It seems he was with the Handford brothers when they were killed. I can email you the page if you are interested.

    Like

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